Scoobert-doobert-doo, where are you?!

Scooby's full name is Scoobert-Doo. The name Scooby-Doo is inspired by a line from Frank Sinatra's song, "Strangers in the Night," in which he sings, "Doobie doobie doo."

Scoobert-doobert-doo, where are you?!

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Oh... so THAT's why Fred and Daphne always went off together.

While audiences speculated that Fred and Daphne would always split off together in order to get down and dirty, the writers explained that they just preferred writing for the other characters. They would send Fred and Daphne off in a less successful direction so they could focus on writing for Velma and Shaggy instead.

Oh... so THAT's why Fred and Daphne always went off together.

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Scooby Doo is OLD!

There have been twelve versions of the TV show over a span of four decades. The most popular shows are the original Scooby-Doo, Where Are You! which ran from 1969-1970 and What's New, Scooby Doo? which ran from 2002 - 2006.

Scooby Doo is OLD!

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Totally too much!

The show was originally pitched as a group of friends in a rock band with a dog named 'Too Much' who plays the bongos.

Totally too much!

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You mean there are more Scoobys?!

Scooby-Doo is a triplet with Skippy-Doo and Dooby-Doo. They have three other siblings named Howdy-Doo, Yabba-Doo, and Ruby-Doo.

You mean there are more Scoobys?!

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Write what you know.

Velma's classic line, "My glasses... I can't see without them!" was actually first said by Velma's voice actor Nicole Jaffe at the first table read. She dropped her glasses and said the line. The writers thought her reaction was cute and threw it into the show.

Write what you know.

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I wonder why Frank Welker missed just that ONE movie!

The only actor to voice the same character through every movie and TV show is Frank Welker, who voices Fred. The only version he missed was the 1988 show, A Pup Named Scooby-Doo.

I wonder why Frank Welker missed just that ONE movie!

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Velma and Shaggy? Yeah right!

Despite rumours that Velma is a lesbian and in love with Daphne, writers made it clear that she was heterosexual and even tried to pair her off with Shaggy in dance sequences.

Velma and Shaggy? Yeah right!

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Shaggy and Scooby forever.

Shaggy-Doo and Scooby-Doo are the only characters to appear in every version of the show.

Shaggy and Scooby forever.

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Scooby-Doo became a star!

Scooby-Doo, Where Are You! was originally named, "W-Who's Scared" but CBS thought the artwork was too frightening for children. Shortly afterward, CBS executive Fred Silverman was listening to the previously mentioned, "Strangers In The Night" song and thought of the name Scooby-Doo for a character. Hanna-Barbara changed the show to star the dog instead of the humans, renamed him Scooby-Doo, and toned down the spooky elements. It was re-pitched to CBS and the rest is history.

Scooby-Doo became a star!

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Rooby Roo!

Dr. Steven Long, associate professor in Speech Pathology and Audiology at Marquette University, was asked to identify Scooby-Doo's speech impediment if it were real. Scooby (voiced by Don Messick ) does not so much mangle words as add letters or replace letters, usually an R in front of a beginning-vowel, or one for another consonant. Dr. Long calls this process "rhoticization", and diagnosed Scooby with the previously-unknown disorder of "Rhotic Replacement".

Rooby Roo!

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Great Dane? Sheepdog? Make up your mind!

Scooby was originally a Great Dane, but producers thought he would look too similar to Marmaduke, another famous cartoon dog, so they changed him to be a sheepdog. This ended up being too similar to Hot Dog from the comic Archie, so they settled back on a Great Dane.

Great Dane? Sheepdog? Make up your mind!

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There's a reason it's the longest running... it's so good!

The Scooby Doo series is the longest running animated franchise produced for Saturday morning television in the United States.

There's a reason it's the longest running... it's so good!

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Casey Kasem stuck to his principles!

During the production of the second season (1970-1971), Casey Kasem, who voices Shaggy, became a strict vegetarian and wanted his character to follow suit. Kasem was promised by Hanna-Barbera that his character would become vegetarian from that point on. They actually kept their end of the bargain for the 1970-1971 season of the show (as long as one assumes that, in Scooby Doo, Where Are You!: Haunted House Hang-Up, Shaggy's bologna slice is vegetarian bologna and that the pizza he eats in the final scene is vegetarian-safe pizza).

In subsequent spin-off series, however, Shaggy is routinely seen snacking on non-vegetarian foods. Kasem put his foot down over this issue in 1995, after he was required to perform Shaggy's voice for a commercial advertising, (decidedly non-vegetarian) Burger King Kids Club meals. Kasem refused to perform the voice after that, and did not return to the role until What's New, Scooby-Doo? (2002) with the requirement that Shaggy be a strict vegetarian in that series, which he is. For the record, Shag's also a vegetarian in the live-action Scooby-Doo (2002).

Casey Kasem stuck to his principles!

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Cute and floppy won over accuracy, when designing Scooby-Doo.

One of Scooby's character designers met with a dog breeder to make sure that they had all the Great Dane specifics correct, but ended up throwing out most of the details mentioned in favor of a cuter, more floppy look.

Cute and floppy won over accuracy, when designing Scooby-Doo.

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Scooby-Doo doesn't exactly rake in the award.

The franchise has only been nominated for two major awards. In 1990, A Pup Named Scooby-Doo was nominated for a Daytime Emmy Award for Outstanding Animated Program but lost to The New Adventures of Winnie-The-Pooh. In 2003, Mindy Cohn, who voices Velma, was nominated for a Daytime Emmy Award for Outstanding Performance in An Animated Program, but lost to Gregory Hines for Little Bill.

Scooby-Doo doesn't exactly rake in the award.

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Casey Kasem is a multifaceted voice actor.

In Scooby Doo! Mystery Incorporated, Casey Kasem provides the voice of Shaggy Rogers' father, Colton Rogers. Kasem was the original voice of Shaggy Rogers in most of the previous incarnations of the Scooby-Doo franchise.

Casey Kasem is a multifaceted voice actor.

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It takes inspiration from other shows.

Several famous scenes in Scooby Doo! Mystery Incorporated were recreated from films like The Shining and Twin Peaks.

It takes inspiration from other shows.

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"That was my outfit, I swear!"

When Velma is sitting in the backseat of the van in Scooby-Doo 2: Monsters Unleashed, and her leather outfit makes a farting noise, the line, "That was my outfit, I swear," was an ad-lib by Linda Cardellini.

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Ruh-Roh!

During filming Scooby-Doo 2: Monsters Unleashed, outside the Vancouver Art Museum, a boom camera zooming into the Mystery Machine after its arrival crashed into the back end of the vehicle, denting it and breaking the lens.

Ruh-Roh!

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The Scooby-Doo movie was supposed to have a very different tone.

The film Scooby-Doo (2002) was originally set to have a much darker tone, essentially poking fun at the original series, and was set for a PG-13 rating. Shaggy was set to be a stoner, Velma and Daphne had a side relationship, and there were many marijuana references. According to Sarah Michelle Gellar, after the cast had signed on, there was a change and the film became more family-friendly.

The Scooby-Doo movie was supposed to have a very different tone.

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C'moooooon, it's SCOOBY!

The director, Raja Gosnell wanted a real life couple to play Daphne and Fred in _Scooby Doo _(2002). His first choice was Sarah Michelle Gellar and Freddie Prinze Jr. Prinze Jr. didn't originally want to do the movie because he felt it wouldn't live up to the Scooby cartoons, but Gellar talked him into it.

C'moooooon, it's SCOOBY!

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A rather exciting little throwback

In the Scooby-Doo (2002) movie, when Daphne attempts to recruit Shaggy and Scooby to inspect the castle with her, Shaggy objects. He says, "Like, Scoob and me don't do castles. Because castles have paintings with eyes that watch you, and suits of armor you think is a statue with a guy inside that follows you every time you turn around!" Everything that Shaggy describes, occurred in Scooby Doo, Where Are You!: What a Night for a Knight (1969), the very first Scooby-Doo cartoon to be aired.

A rather exciting little throwback

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It turns out a lot of celebrities have been interested in being part of the franchise.

The idea of a live-action Scooby-Doo movie languished in "development purgatory" throughout most of the 1990s. In 1996, Jim Carrey was attached to play Shaggy and Sara Gilbert was attached to play Velma. At one point, director Kevin Smith was attached, but later dropped out. Later, Mike Myers accepted the project and was the one who most often had his name linked to it. Janeane Garofalo was supposedly tapped by Myers to play Velma. Eventually, even Myers had to leave the project.

It turns out a lot of celebrities have been interested in being part of the franchise.

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Spike Brandt and Tony Cervone wanted to stay true to the original

In developing the updated series, Scooby-Doo! Mystery Incorporated (2010--2013), producers Spike Brandt and Tony Cervone and producer/head writer Mitch Watson began with the original 1968-69 development art for Scooby Doo, Where Are You! (1969) by Joe Ruby and Ken Spears, which included information about the Scooby-Doo characters' ages, parents, and home/school life that never made it onscreen in the original series. In Ruby and Spears' original series bible, Fred and Shaggy are each 17 years old, Daphne is 16, and Velma is 15. For the purposes of this series, the kids were made roughly the same age: 16-17 in Season 1, and 17-18 in Season 2.

Spike Brandt and Tony Cervone wanted to stay true to the original

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Scooby is usually portrayed as a nice character, but sometimes...

The Scooby-Doo on Zombie Island movie is the first time Scooby-Doo shows any aggression towards another animal. In all previous series, he is kind and friendly towards not only cats but others such as mice, gophers, and chicks.

Scooby is usually portrayed as a nice character, but sometimes...

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I'm "marvelling" at it all!

Several members of the cast and crew of Scooby-Doo 2: Monsters Unleashed went on to work on films in the Marvel Cinematic Universe. Writer 'James Gunn' went on to write and direct both Guardians of the Galaxy (2014) and Guardians of the Galaxy Vol. 2 (2017), which also featured 'Seth Green'. Linda Cardellini went on to appear in Avengers: Age of Ultron (2015), and Tim Blake Nelson appeared in The Incredible Hulk (2008).

I'm

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Jeepers creepers!

Legendary anime voice actor Bob Papenbrook was cast as the voice of the Black Knight because of his cameo in Jeepers Creepers II (2003). There was also a Scooby-Doo villain called "The Creeper" that appeared in the first Scooby-Doo show, and it's episode with him was set in the country area of America, which is where the Jeepers Creepers films were set in.

Jeepers creepers!

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Nightmare at 20,000 reference!

In Be Cool, Scooby-Doo, the episode named "Gremlin on a Plane" was a nod to a classic Twilight Zone episode "Nightmare at 20,000" featuring William Shatner on plane seeing a creature on the wing of the plane.

Nightmare at 20,000 reference!

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The TV show may have still been going, but amusement parks had left the Scooby Train.

At the time the series Be Cool, Scooby-Doo began airing on Cartoon Network and Boomerang, the Sally Dark Ride Corporation along with Alterface, Oceaneering International, and Pure Imagination Studios changed the amusement park ride "Scooby-Doo! Ghostblasters: The Mystery of the Scary Swamp" to "Justice League: Battle for Metropolis" at the Six Flags St. Louis location in Eureka, Missouri.

The TV show may have still been going, but amusement parks had left the Scooby Train.

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Sarah Michelle Gellar had a tough schedule!

Sarah Michelle Gellar had to film Scooby-Doo around her already hectic Buffy the Vampire Slayer (1997) schedule. The producers of both productions arranged it so that she would spend two weeks in Los Angeles shooting Buffy, then the next two weeks in Queensland, Australia filming Scooby-Doo.

Sarah Michelle Gellar had a tough schedule!

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What is everyone up to now?

In Scooby-Doo (2002) when Fred, Velma and Daphne meet up at the airport, there was originally a flashback for each of them showing what they had all been doing: Fred on a book tour, Velma in a support group and Daphne learning Martial Arts. The flashbacks were cut out because they were deemed to dragged out the scene.

What is everyone up to now?

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Roh! The Rirony!

It's ironic that Scooby Doo eventually became a live-action movie because the gang featured in the Scooby cartoons is actually based on the real actors/characters from Dobie Gillis, a live-action sitcom from the sixties. Fred is based on Dobie, Shaggy is Maynard, Velma is Zelda and Daphne is Thalia.

Roh! The Rirony!

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Buffy referenced Scooby-Doo

In Sarah Michelle Gellar's television show, Buffy the Vampire Slayer, the group of teenage monster hunters occasionally refers to themselves as "The Scooby Gang" or simply "The Scoobies."

Buffy referenced Scooby-Doo

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Neil Fanning and Matthew Lillard became friends on set

Neil Fanning was on set for Scooby-Doo (2002) every day to provide Scooby's dialogue for the cast to interact with. This led to him and Matthew Lillard becoming close friends, as they had to be very inventive to make Shaggy and Scooby's friendship convincing, (since Lillard was acting with nothing there except Fanning's voice off-screen).

Neil Fanning and Matthew Lillard became friends on set

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Hydrocronic

When Shaggy and Scooby are approached by the spooky island representative on the beach in Scooby-Doo (2002), Shaggy claims that they don't go anywhere with spooky, haunted or abandoned in the name, to which Scooby adds "Or rydrocgronic." And Shaggy says, "Right, or hydrocolonic" which is often misheard as "or hydrochronic." Hydrochronic is slang for a very potent strain of Mary-Jane.

Hydrocronic

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Lights, Camera... Huh?

In Scooby-Doo (2002), the kitchen in the Spooky Island Castle where Shaggy and Scooby have their burp/fart competition is the same kitchen in which the brainwashing training video was filmed. This explains why there is a camera in the kitchen and Shaggy says, "Lights, camera, action. Huh Scoob" when he notices it.

Lights, Camera... Huh?

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It's a dead world after all...

As the gang arrives on the island, in _Scooby-Doo _(2002), Mondavarious (Rowan Atkinson) says "...It's a dead world after all." This is the same line, (with one word changed) from the song, "It's a small world after all" which was also briefly sung in The Lion King (1994) by Zazu, who is also voiced by Rowan Atkinson.

It's a dead world after all...

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Carl Sagan was a huge fan of the show.

Famous science popularizer, Carl Sagan is someone who disapproves of the popular belief in various paranormal ideas, so Sagan approved of the series' skeptic tone of the heroes who usually expose supernatural claims as hoaxes.

Carl Sagan was a huge fan of the show.

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Geoff, Kelly, Linda, W.W, and Too Much.

These are the original names for the characters during the show's development when it was known as "Mystery Five" or "Mysteries Five," and later "W-Who's S-S-Scared?":

Freddy: "Geoff", later "Ronnie" (Freddy was actually identified as Ronnie on the final storyboards for the first few episodes of the series)

Daphne: "Kelly"

Velma: "Linda"

Shaggy:"W.W."

Scooby-Doo: "Too Much" (as in: "That's just too much!" a popular catchphrase of the time)

Geoff, Kelly, Linda, W.W, and Too Much.

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Is Shaggy into the green stuff?

There has always been a rumor that Shaggy is an avid consumer of 420 products. That's why he has the munchies and he always sees the ghosts (hallucinations) before the others. There is also the idea that Scooby Snacks contain some sort of illegal substances as well.

There may be some truth to this rumor. Shaggy is a "beatnik/hippie"-type character, and beatniks and hippies were known for their "free-thinking" ways, which often included the uses of recreational substances. However, not all beatniks and hippies did this, and it is very possible, considering this is a Saturday morning television show, that Shaggy was one of those beatniks/hippies that didn't.

The second idea is completely false: Scooby Snacks are nothing more than regular doggie treats, (it's not much of a stretch to imagine a guy who would eat chocolate-covered hot dogs, chocolate-covered corn-on-the-cob, and "liverwurst a la mode" eating doggie treats if you really think about it).

Is Shaggy into the green stuff?

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A fairly valid Scooby-Doo conspiracy theory

A conspiracy theory has emerged that the show takes place after an economic depression. This explains why the "monsters" always turned out to be well-respected types of people such as professors, museum curators, and celebrities who have fallen into hard times like everybody else.

A fairly valid Scooby-Doo conspiracy theory

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Audio factoid!

The "thunder" sound effect at the beginning of the opening credits of Scooby-Doo, Where Are You? is actually the sound of a tape-echo unit, (a type of recording studio equipment), feeding back on itself. If you listen carefully, you can hear the "boom" repeating over and over at a rate of about twice per second. The "shimmering" sound effect as the series title materializes from the castle window is produced by the same method but at a higher pitch/speed.

Audio factoid!

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The original theme song was slightly different.

The vocal "Scooby-Doo Where Are You!" theme was not the original theme composed for this series; musical director Ted Nichols had originally composed an instrumental theme for the show, which alternates with the the more familiar David Mook/Ben Raleigh theme, (which was recorded three days before the premiere of the show on September 13, 1969), on the original broadcast prints of the show.

The original theme song was slightly different.

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There was a lot of influence from other places.

The show was originally created to expand upon the success of The Archie Show (1968). Series creators Joe Ruby and Ken Spears and Scooby-Doo writer Mark Evanier have stated that the teenagers were based on characters from another CBS show, The Many Loves of Dobie Gillis (1959). Fred was based on Dobie Gillis, Daphne on Thalia Menninger, Velma on Zelda Gilroy, and Shaggy on Maynard G. Krebs (even having similar goatee beards and hairstyles). Another influence was the 1940s radio drama, "I Love a Mystery"; the concept was also similar to Enid Blyton's Famous Five books.

There was a lot of influence from other places.

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