It's late at night after a long day at work. The kids are in bed. Candles are lit. Silk sheets grace the mattress in the master bedroom. The spouse has slipped into an outfit intended for a more comfortable event. You know what it is time for, right?

The next episode of Making A Murderer, of course...

See that face Jerome Fox (from the aforementioned Netflix docuseries) is giving you? That's the face of judgment for choosing TV binging over love, which, apparently, has been the case for many couples lately.

According to the National Center For Health Statistics, fertility rates in the United States dropped lower than necessary for the population to even thrive in 2017. A report on the matter by the Wall Street Journal, suggests that binge watching is a leading cause. Instead of "Netflix and Chill," we're seeing more "Netflix and Netflix."

But how can this be?

"If you’re watching something streaming, the next episode is immediately available, and there are no commercials where you could look over and say, 'Honey, you look cute tonight,'" Dr. Jean Twenge, an author of the 2017 paper “Archives of Sexual Behavior,” said.

In other words, the commercial break is your wingman/wingwoman and Netflix's commercial-free policy is your mother inviting herself into your bedroom while your significant other is visiting.

But if given the choice between the two (late night binging or late night fun), what wins? It depends on who you are talking to. According to a survey conducted by Survey Monkey, one out of four people admit that they would rather binge-watch a series than make love.

The Wall Street Journal article even quotes a couple who whose plans to conceive their third child have been repeatedly thwarted by the next episode of Schitt's Creek to pop up on autoplay. Perhaps if we knew what that was, we might understand.

On the plus side, it looks like we may have found birth control you could trust even better than a Trojan.

Of course, Netflix, always quick to avoid a PR nightmare, is denying any connection to this "block."

"We take pride in being part of the cultural zeitgeist, but getting credit for a decades-long decline in sex is beyond even our programming abilities," a Netflix spokesperson responded, supposedly taking a page from the "Don't blame McDonald's for obesity" philosophy.

But, they may have a point. Before citing an addiction to binge-watching as a cause for intimacy issues, instead, plan a schedule for both (just not at the same time). That way, each night can allow for a shamelessly satisfying experience for you and your partner.

What do you think?

Is Netflix as birth control a ridiculous claim, or have you noticed less foreplay and more "Press Play" in your life too?

Let us know in the comments below!

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